Some people just can’t stay home

Look up Clara Barton. During the Civil War she couldn’t stay home. She had to get out and help those who were suffering and dying on the battlefield. I’m sure plenty of people told her she was crazy, that what could one woman do (especially a woman in those times when women stayed home). She ignored them, and of course after the war founded the Red Cross. All because she insisted on loving the least of these. Today, somebody might tell you you’re crazy, that you can’t change the world, that you can’t do what you’ve set your mind to. Don’t “stay home”. Get out there anyway.

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6 thoughts on “Some people just can’t stay home

  1. Jonathan Woodard says:

    My younger sister had taken a pen and written “MILLOINS” on her hand. Instead of telling her immediately about the mispelling, I asked her why. She told me how she spoke with a prophet about 3 years ago after a youth service at Manassas Assembly, who told her that if she turned away from Christ, millions would not be influenced with the gospel. I thought that was cool.

    We have the best motivator in the Holy Spirit and the best example in Christ. Individually, obedience may lead to something less impressive (in human’s eyes) than Clara Barton. But staying home won’t look good on judgment day, when Christ will judge our deeds, motives and words, and it doesn’t look good now in the face of huge world problems.

  2. pietrosquared says:

    Jonathan,

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts. It’s great to hear from you! I think that the kind of thinking you’re talking about is dangerous, though.

    I would definitely hesitate to say that Christ is dependent on us to get His message out. I mean, he’d use the rocks and stones if he had to… no problem… And I would hesitate even further to think that anyone who follows Jesus is in any danger on judgment day, as there is no condemnation for those who are in Christ.

    If someone thought that millions would be dependent on them to hear the Gospel, and then if that person lived their life rather ordinarily and didn’t affect millions, would they then think that they were a failure.

    Someone like Clara Barton steps out and loves the way she did as an extension of that love of neighbor that we are called to, and I suspect as the result of doing some very ordinary things one at a time… and it just built.

    Besides, I’ve seen people serve God because of fear of hell, and it’s not pretty. I’ve seen people serve God and love their neighbor in some extraordinary ways… and it’s beautiful…

  3. dyingtolive444 says:

    Have you ever seen someone beautifully serve God and love their neighbor because of both a love for God and a fear of God?

    You are right that those who continue to follow Christ until the end (believing that Christ is all he said he is, and therefore making him their Lord) should have no fear of hell on the day of judgment. (John 3:16-18, Roman 10:9, Rom 8:1)

    And we shouldn’t fear that we individually are the only ones that God would use. Most people need to hear from multiple sources. But I also think that an individual can be one source for a large group of people. And I fear missing the opportunity he gives to let me participate with him as his child. And there are some people that will not hear the gospel from anyone unless I go tell them.

    He could use rocks (or angels). But He has chosen not to, and to use people in the equation of each person’s salvation. Otherwise, the great commission would not be needed, and we should pray the rocks would speak up. I have a Muslim friend who received dreams that directed her towards Christianity, but she had heard the gospel from a human after the dream to seal the deal.

    My sister just told me that she wishes she would have myspaced replied to a guy who killed himself recently. We can have a partial impact, and you never know if that can make a difference.

    Paul had love for people and fear of God (Phil 2:12, 2 Cor 5:11, Heb 11:7)
    Our eternal existence with Christ can range from barely getting in and having all our deeds burned up in the fire, to having a rich welcome with “Well done good and faithful servant” and having increased responsibility in reigning with Christ. That’s enough to keep your regular attention, not to mention fear of getting disqualified ourselves(1 Cor 9:27) Christians should fear not remaining in Christ which can lead to not bearing fruit ( John 15:4-5)and getting cut off.(John 15:5-6)

    Jesus says “Behold, I am coming soon! My reward is with me, and I will give to everyone according to what he has done.” His talking about a “reward” makes me think that this “give everyone according to what he has done” is also about believers.

    Fear of the Lord is wise and healthy. We should fear the possibility of hell for us if we don’t continue in Christ, hell for others who don’t believe, loss of eternal reward that we could’ve had, lost intimacy with Christ, and lost blessing that comes only from obedience. Fear can lead to positive results. For example, I love my wife, but I fear the consequences of cheating on her physically or mentally. Often, people need fear as a motivator to keep a healthy relationship, in addition to love.

  4. Bratley says:

    hmmmmmmmmm,
    Fear of the Lord. I don’t see this a scare tactic of our Lord to get a person to stay on the narrow path, or to make us obey. that’s….. robotic,….cold. The fear I see is the knowledge of Him. (Wisdom of God)That fact we know very little about our Lord and yet can have this wow kind of relationship that’s warm and alive. Paul knew of this type of fear and that’s why he sang in the jail. That’s why he said Rom 14:8 If we live, it is for the Lord that we live, and if we die, it is for the Lord that we die. So whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord. Those who have this relationship also have this as well,..
    GRACE! It’s not a free ticket to do what you want. It’s another chance to grow in the fear of the Lord.

    Bratley out.

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